a simple, frugal heart.

22 notes

fairmatter:

Dostoevsky, Joyce, Kafka, and Wharton have all cemented spots in the quarterfinals. But which lucky books will go on to the semis? Your chance to choose! Submit your votes here.

fairmatter:

Dostoevsky, Joyce, Kafka, and Wharton have all cemented spots in the quarterfinals. But which lucky books will go on to the semis? Your chance to choose! Submit your votes here.

(via thetinhouse)

52,610 notes

leslieseuffert:

Numen/ For Use For Use used thick transparent sticky tape to create an interactive installation. By stretching, sticking and wrapping thick layers of tape around grounded pillars, beams, trees or whatever standing objects exist in the chosen space Numen/ For Use create a web of tendon tunnels and spaces that can be accessed and crawled through, strong enough to carry human weight. From afar the installation appears like an interwoven structure of bending elastic pipes.

(via paperdarts)

0 notes

The Art of the Sentence: Edward Hirsch

“These were the strokes we praised, weren’t they,/ the butterfly and the crawl, the lullabies/ we crooned on the first warm day of summer/ in honor of the non-swimmers Crane and Berryman,/ in honor of Orpheus, whose butchered head/ is forever singing above the choppy waves.” —Edward Hirsch, “The Swimmers” (Special Orders, 2008)

330 notes

[…] read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul; and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body…
Preface to Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman  (via delicateswans)

(via booklover)

Filed under walt whitman Leaves of Grass poetry

884 notes

ancientart:

The Newspaper Rock State Historic Monument, which features a 200-square-foot rock with one of the best preserved, largest known collections of petroglyphs. Located in San Juan County, Utah, USA.

The first carvings of Newspaper Rock date to around 2,000 years ago, and were left by people from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont, Navajo, Anglo, and Pueblo cultures.

[…] a heavily marked rock surface that looks as if it could have served as a bulletin board for passersby. In actuality, we do not know how these sites were used, but the notion of a communication center has endured.

-Liz & Peter Welsh, Rock-Art of the Southwest

Photos courtesy & taken by Jesse Varner.

Filed under ancient art petroglyphs